Frequently Asked Questions

Find answers to some of the common questions we all have while we continue the course to stop the spread of COVID-19.

The Shelby County Health Department is committed to providing our community with the most accurate information about COVID-19. 

For answers to specific questions, call the Shelby County Health Department COVID-19 Call Center at 901-222-MASK (6275). 

General Information

Can I get a COVID-19 test in Shelby County?

Yes. If you feel you need to be tested, appointments are available across Shelby County for free COVID-19 testing. If you suspect that you have been exposed to someone who has tested positive for COVID-19 and are experiencing mild to moderate symptoms, please call your healthcare provider, the Shelby County COVID-19 hotline: 833-943-1658, or contact one of the available testing sites to make an appointment.

Do call a doctor’s office or healthcare center for COVID-19 testing prior to arriving to confirm whether you need an appointment. If you intend to visit an emergency department for testing or treatment do call ahead to notify them first.

Can you have Coronavirus if you don't feel sick?

Yes. COVID-19 can be spread by asymptomatic people — those who do not have symptoms and may not even know that they are infected. That’s why it’s important for everyone to wear masks in public settings and practice social distancing (staying at least 6 feet away from other people).

Why is it important to social-distance from others?

Coronavirus is spread mainly from person to person, through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs, sneezes, or talks. These droplets can land in the mouths or noses of people who are nearby or possibly be inhaled into the lungs. Spread is more likely when people are in close contact with one another (within about 6 feet). By maintaining at least 6-feet away from others, you reduce your risk of contracting Coronavirus, or spreading it to others if you have been infected.

What does "comorbidities" mean?

People with certain medical conditions like diabetes, heart disease and respiratory illness have an increased risk of severe illness from COVID-19. When an individual with any of these underlying conditions contracts COVID-19, their preexisting condition, or “comorbidity,” increases the chances of severe symptoms and even death.

In Shelby County, 94% of deaths related to COVID-19 have had a preexisting condition — or comorbidity. People of any age with the following conditions are at increased risk of severe illness from COVID-19:

Learn more at cdc.gov

What COVID-19 treatment is available for people with risk factors?

An effective early treatment is now available for persons who test positive and have the following risk factors:

  • Anyone over age 12 with obesity, chronic kidney disease, diabetes, or whose immunity is compromised by disease or prescription treatments.
  • Anyone age 12-17 with sickle cell disease; neuromuscular disorder; dependence on medical intervention, such as a breathing or feeding tube; or a lung disorder such as asthma that requires daily medication.
  • Anyone over age 55 with cardiovascular disease, hypertension, COPD or other chronic respiratory disease.
  • Anyone over age 65.

If you test positive, and have any of these risk factors, ask your health care provider about early COVID-19 treatments.

The COVID-19 Vaccine

What kind of vaccine is the COVID-19 vaccine?

At the current time, both of the vaccines that are made available in Shelby County are a new type of vaccine, called mRNA vaccines. To trigger an immune response, many vaccines put a weakened or inactivated germ into our bodies. Not mRNA vaccines. Instead, they teach our cells how to make a protein—or even just a piece of a protein—that triggers an immune response inside our bodies. That immune response, which produces antibodies, is what protects us from getting infected if the real virus enters our bodies. More about mRNA vaccines here: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/different-vaccines/mrna.html.

There are other vaccines being studied that may be available in the future that are not mRNA vaccines.

Is the vaccine safe?

Yes. No serious side effects have been observed. Some people who have received the vaccine experienced headache, tiredness, or had some redness and soreness where they received the vaccine. These are not unusual signs and symptoms for any vaccine and usually go away within a couple of days. There are several systems in place to make sure any side effects from the vaccine are reported and documented. The COVID-19 vaccines will be monitored to ensure their safety.

The CDC has set up a smartphone-based tool that uses text messaging and web surveys to provide personalized health check-ins after you receive a COVID-19 vaccination. Through v-safe, you can quickly tell CDC if you have any side effects after getting the COVID-19 vaccine. Learn more and register here: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/safety/vsafe.html.

Can I get COVID-19 from the vaccine?

No. It is not possible to get the virus from the vaccine.

Why are two vaccinations necessary?

While one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine appears to offer protection against the virus, it takes two doses of the vaccine for the body to develop optimal immunity to the virus. For the Pfizer vaccine, the second dose is required within 21 days of the first dose. For the Moderna vaccine, the second dose is required within 28 days.

Does the first dose of the vaccine provide any protection against the virus?

There is data regarding the Moderna vaccine that indicates the first dose of vaccine provides up to 80% immunity against the virus. The first dose, combined with second dose provides at least 94% immunity.

How will I know when to get the second dose?

When you get your first dose, you will receive a card with the date of your first dose, the product name/manufacturer of the vaccine you just received, and the date on which you should receive your second dose. Note that your second dose of COVID-19 vaccine must be from the same product name/manufacturer as your first dose. We recommend when you receive your card, take a picture as a back-up, and add the date to your calendar. Some providers may send reminders via text or email.

What happens if a person is late in getting their second dose of vaccine?

There is not much known yet about the impact of a late second dose on immunity, but people should receive the second dose, even if it is late.

If I get COVID-19 after taking the first dose of vaccine, but before taking the second dose, do I wait to receive the second dose?

Get the second dose after you recover from the illness and you have completed your period of isolation.

Who can get the vaccine first?

While vaccine supplies are limited, the distribution plan focuses on providing vaccines to those at highest risk of becoming infected with the virus and/or suffering from life-threatening disease. The priority groups were selected based upon the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine’s Framework for the Equitable Allocation of COVID-19 Vaccine, the CDC’s Playbook for Jurisdictions, and has been vetted with a diverse stakeholder group of more than thirty partners statewide, who represent the interests of millions of Tennesseans.

Click here for the list of groups who can currently be vaccinated at a Health Department site.

How can I protect myself against COVID-19 until I can get the vaccine?

It may be months before the vaccine is made available to the general population of Shelby County. In the interim, continue the preventive steps that are proven to reduce transmission of the virus:

  1. Per Governor Bill Lee’s Executive Order #70, do not hold indoor gatherings of more than 10 persons
  2. Per Safer at Home Health Directive No. 16, stay home as much as possible between December 26, 2020 and January 22, 2021
  3. Keep at least 6 feet of separation between yourself and others from outside of your household
  4. Wear a mask or facial covering whenever you are in public or with people from outside your household
  5. Wash your hands frequently with soap and water, and use hand sanitizer when soap and water is not available
  6. Stay home from work, school, shopping or social activities if you are sick
  7. Get tested. COVID-19 testing is free and available to anyone with or without symptoms at convenient community testing sites around Shelby County. Click here for the list of community testing sites.

Mask Usage

Is there any evidence that wearing a mask prevents the spread of COVID-19?

Yes. Masks are recommended as a simple barrier to help prevent respiratory droplets from traveling into the air and onto other people when the person wearing the mask coughs, sneezes, talks, or raises their voice. This is called source control. This recommendation is based on what we know about the role respiratory droplets play in the spread of the virus that causes COVID-19, paired with emerging evidence from clinical and laboratory studies that shows masks reduce the spray of droplets when worn over the nose and mouth.

Who should not wear a mask?

Masks should not be worn by:
  • Children younger than 3 years old (before their 3rd birthday)
  • Anyone who has trouble breathing
  • Anyone who is unconscious, incapacitated, or otherwise unable to remove the mask without assistance

See more from the CDC about considerations of mask wearing.

Mask Usage and Polling Places

Are face covering required while inside any voting location?

Face coverings are strongly encouraged (and will be provided) at all voting locations for anyone voting or administering an election.

Sports and Athletic Activities

Non-school-sponsored Athletic Activities

Are non-school-sponsored athletics, including practices and games/competitions permitted to occur?

It is not the Health Department’s recommendation that high-contact/high-risk sports of any kind occur at the present time (please refer to NFHS definitions of high-risk sports below).

Nevertheless, pursuant to Governor Lee’s Executive Order 55, non-school-sponsored athletics may take place as permitted by the Tennessee Economic Recovery Group (i.e., Tennessee Pledge) and provided that all such activities are conducted in a manner consistent with COVID-19-related regulations adopted by Tennessee Pledge, including any forthcoming state guidance.

The Health Department is available to provide technical assistance on conducting any non-school sponsored athletics activities.

Any facility where a non-school sponsored athletic event occurs (including practices and games/competitions) must comply with all applicable provisions of the current Shelby County Health Directive and Shelby County Face Mask Directive, both of which can be found here: www.shelbytnhealth.com/healthdirectives.

School Sports and Activities

Are schools authorized to permit (or not) school-sponsored sporting events and activities?

Yes, pursuant to Governor Lee’s Executive Order 55, local education agencies and schools may permit, but are not required to permit, school-sponsored sporting events and activities, provided that all such activities, including practices and games or competition, must be conducted in a manner consistent with COVID-19-related regulations adopted by the Tennessee Secondary Schools Athletic Association.

The Health Department is available to provide technical assistance on any sports event or activity.

Contact Tracing

What is “contact tracing?”

Case investigation is the identification and investigation of patients with confirmed and probable diagnoses of COVID-19, and contact tracing is the subsequent identification, monitoring, and support of their contacts who have been exposed to, and possibly infected with, the virus.

Case investigation and contact tracing are well-honed skills that adapt easily to new public health demands and are effective tools to slow the spread of COVID-19 in a community.

Why is “contact tracing” critical to fighting the COVID-19 virus?

Case investigation and contact tracing are fundamental activities that involve working with a patient who has been diagnosed with COVID-19 (case) to identify people who may have been exposed to the patient (contacts).

This process prevents further transmission of disease by separating people who have (or may have) an infectious disease from people who do not.

It is a core disease control measure that has been employed by public health agency personnel for decades.

Is contact tracing or case investigation different from screenings of employees or visitors at certain locations?

Yes. Employers and businesses may require employees or visitors to report any positive COVID-19 test result and/or submit to screening as part of maintaining a safe workplace or establishment.

Please review the most current version of the health directive for further information on this: www.shelbytnhealth.com/healthdirectives.

Is the Health Department required by law to conduct contact tracing/case investigations?

Yes. Pursuant to state law, the Department shall receive reports of suspected cases of COVID-19 and must:

  1. Confer with the entity or person making the report;
  2. Collect any specimens for laboratory examinations to confirm the report and/or to find the source of the infection;
  3. Obtain all names and information necessary to identify and contact all persons potentially exposed to the source of the disease outbreak as needed to protect public health;
  4. Make a complete epidemiological investigation, including review of appropriate medical and laboratory records of affected persons and controls, interviews of affected persons and controls, and a recording of findings; and
  5. Establish appropriate control measures including examination, treatment, isolation, quarantine, exclusion, disinfection, surveillance, closure of an establishment, education, and other measures considered appropriate for the protection of public health.

Do health departments have exclusive authority to conduct contact tracing/case investigation work?

Yes. Governor Lee’s Executive Orders dictate a statewide approach to the COVID-19 pandemic, but certain counties with locally run health departments, including the Shelby County Health Department, have been delegated authority to issue local orders or measures related to the containment or management of the spread of COVID-19, which includes contact tracing and case investigations. These measures are further defined and explained in state law.

Does an individual or employer have an obligation to engage in contact tracing or case investigation with anyone besides the Shelby County Health Department or State of Tennessee Department of Health?

No. Please note that employers may request screening information from employees and visitors to ensure workplace safety and for purposes of complying with health directive and state/federal law.

Employers may be required to maintain and release records of confirmed cases that are workplace safety-related pursuant to OSHA/TOSHA record-keeping requirements as set forth in federal regulations.

When an individual tests positive, must the individual cooperate with the Department for purposes of contact tracing?

Yes. Pursuant to state law, corresponding regulations, and directives, individuals must cooperate with the Department by providing records or other information necessary to carry out the purposes listed above for contact tracing.

When an employee tests positive, must the employer report the positive case to the Department for purposes of contact tracing?

Yes. Pursuant to state law, corresponding regulations, and directives, individuals must cooperate with the Department by providing records or other information necessary to carry out the purposes listed above for contact tracing.

Are professionals who practice the “healing arts” (as defined by state law), such as nurses or doctors required to report positive test results to the Health Department?

Yes. All healthcare providers and other persons knowing of or suspecting a case of a reportable disease or event shall report that occurrence to the Department of Health.

Any person licensed by the State of Tennessee to practice a healing art who has reasonable cause to believe that a person is or may be a health threat to others because the person is unable, is unwilling, or is failing to act in such a manner as to not place others at significant risk of exposure to infection that causes serious illness, disability, or death shall report that information to the Commissioner or a health officer.

The profession or the entity for whom the professional works may assume the obligation to report on behalf of the professional.

Does confidential health information related to contact tracing that is provided to the Health Department remain confidential?

Yes. Pursuant to state and federal law and regulation, whenever any individual, employer, or entity provides medical information and relevant non-medical records to a duly authorized representative of the Department for purposes of contact tracing, such information shall be treated as confidential and sensitive and shall not be disclosed in any manner that would violate state and federal law.

If someone provides their confidential health information to a governmental entity, health care agency, or employer (other than the Department) for the purpose of contact tracing, does that information remain confidential under state and/or federal law?

The Department cannot ensure the confidentiality of health information that is provided to employers and/or third parties, though such parties may have separate confidentiality obligations.

Restaurants, Taprooms, etc.

Curbside, Drive-thru, and Delivery Service

May curbside, drive-thru, and delivery service continue by any properly permitted/licensed food service entity?

Legally permitted curbside, drive-thru, and delivery service may continue (except for the sale of alcoholic beverages) without the restriction of closing at 10 pm as long as such services also comply with state law.

Taprooms, Breweries, Distilleries

Are taprooms, breweries, distilleries, wine bars, beer-only bars or any other alcohol production businesses where on-premises consumption of alcohol occurs permitted to operate?

Legally permitted outdoor dining may be provided without capacity restrictions. All other safety requirements must be followed, including the use of masks and facial coverings by employees and customers at all times except when actually eating and drinking

An enclosed tent outside of or adjoining the establishment is considered indoor dining, and capacity is limited to 50%

COVID-19 Case Classification

Who counts as a COVID-19 case?

The Shelby County Health Department uses standard criteria to define a case, which was developed from national guidance put out by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Only individuals who test positive for SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID, or who meet specific symptom and exposure criteria are considered COVID-19 cases.

Who counts as a confirmed case?

Anyone who has a positive confirmatory test result for the virus that causes COVID-19. The only confirmatory test for SARS-CoV-2 is a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test, which detects the genetic material of the virus. Individuals must have a positive PCR test to be counted as a confirmed case.

The vast majority of all COVID-19 cases in Tennessee were classified as confirmed cases, meaning they had a positive PCR test.

Who counts as a probable case?

Anyone who has not had a positive confirmatory test, but 1) has a positive antigen test or 2) meets the clinical criteria of COVID-19 infection and is at high risk for having been infected with COVID-19 by another person, such as being a close contact.

The majority of probable cases have a positive antigen test. As antigen tests become more widely available, there will be an increase in probable cases in Tennessee and nationwide.

Why do we count probable cases?

Including probable cases in case counts provides a better understanding of COVID-19 illness in the community. Not every person who has COVID-19 will get tested with a confirmatory test, so including those who are tested with an antigen test or who have COVID-19 symptoms after exposure to the virus helps the Shelby County Health Department (SCHD) better understand how many people in Tennessee have COVID-19. SCHD reports probable cases as recommended and follows national criteria to ensure the infection is reported uniformly across the country.

How does public health respond to cases?

Shelby County Health Department investigates confirmed and probable cases in the same way, by interviewing the case and identifying contacts.

Isolation:

A person who tests positive for COVID-19 is placed in isolation for at least 10 days. That means you must stay at home without any visitors and avoid other household members as much as possible. After 10 days, if you have not experienced symptoms or fever for at least 24 hours, you are considered recovered and can be released to resume daily activities, including work. A negative test result is not required to return to work, once the isolation period is completed. However, if you are experiencing symptoms, the period of isolation may be extended to up to 21 days, or until you have been without symptoms for at least 24 hours. Recovered persons do not need to be retested if they are re-exposed within 90 days nor are placed in quarantine again within 90 days.

Contact Tracing:

Individuals who test positive for COVID-19 must notify those who are known to have been in contact with them and also comply with the Health Department on case investigations.  If you test positive, you will be asked to list everyone you have been in close contact with for 2 days before you developed symptoms or 2 days before you were tested, if you have no symptoms. Anyone who has been within 6 feet of you for 15 minutes or longer during that time period will be placed into quarantine.

Quarantine:

Quarantine is a public health strategy used to separate someone who may have been exposed to an illness and who is still in a period of time when they can develop illness. Quarantine is used to prevent transmission in the event the exposed person develops the illness. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) originally set a 14-day quarantine period for COVID-19 based on estimates of the upper bounds of the virus’ incubation period. Since that time, research indicates that more than 90% of exposed persons who go on to develop COVID-19 illness develop symptoms within 10 days of exposure. For that reason the CDC has revised its guidance to allow for a shorter quarantine period under the following conditions:

  • Quarantine can end after Day 10 of of exposure without testing and if no symptoms have been reported during daily monitoring.
  • In some cases, quarantine can end after Day 7 of exposure, if a diagnostic specimen tests negative for the SARS-CoV-2 virus and if no symptoms were reported during daily monitoring, but quarantine cannot be discontinued earlier than after Day 7.

In both cases, the quarantined person must continue to 1. Monitor for signs and symptoms of illness, 2. Wear a mask when around others, and 3. Observe social distancing through Day 14 of exposure.

Worship services, wedding ceremonies and receptions

How should I conduct my wedding and/or wedding reception under the current Health Directive?

Governor Lee’s executive orders preempt local health department directives as to weddings and currently (as of May 22, 2020) provides the following:

Worship services, weddings, funerals, and events related thereto are not social gatherings … and nothing in this Order mandates closure of a place of worship, or prohibits weddings or funerals as a matter of law. Nevertheless, places of worship are strongly encouraged to continue to utilize virtual or online services and gatherings and strongly encouraged to follow the Guidance for Gathering Together in Houses of Worship issued by the Governor’s Office of Faith-Based and Community Initiatives regarding in-person services that can be conducted safely. Likewise, persons at weddings and funerals are strongly encouraged to follow the Health Guidelines and maintain appropriate social distancing as provided for herein to the greatest extent practicable, although it is further strongly encouraged that any large public celebration component of weddings and funerals be postponed or attended only by close family members.

Please reach out to the Office of Faith-Based and Community Initiatives for assistance on planning your wedding, and if needed, further questions can be directed to the Tennessee Department of Health.

Wedding planners are encouraged to use their creativity to plan memorable and safe weddings and/or receptions and should follow applicable guidelines set forth in the current Health Directive, such as general business safety measures, safety measures for businesses that are permitted to be open, safety measures addressing food service (see restaurants and hotels), permitted numbers of people for gatherings, and so forth.

Please note that the Directive does not affect the operations of any place of worship.